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SEM

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Zebrafish Neuromast

This is the cover page image published in Developmental Cell, August 14 2012. The Image was taken at Center for Electron Microscopy and Nanofabrication, Portland State University by instrument manager Greg Baty to support the post doctorial research work of Katie Kindt at OHSU (Teresa Nicolson lab Oregon Hearing Research Center). The research was funded by NIH and HHMI grant. The image is of a Zebra fish neuromast taken near the ear. Katie Kindt false colored the SEM image taken by Greg Baty Katie’s main interest in taking the SEM image was to examine the stereocilia and correlate the result with confocal studies that where performed while the zebra fish was alive. Katie and Gabe Finch at OHSU had a difficult time preparing the fish for SEM, due to the variability in a rapidly growing fish that is three days old. It was necessary to perform some digestion to expose the cilia for fixation. This was a very difficult imaging job for Greg since CEMN does not have a sputter coater with a tilting orbital stage and our Sirion is a high vacuum only instrument. The length and geometry of the cilia combined with charging due to poor coating tends to cause the celia to move in the electron beam. It took an interdisciplinary team effort to produce an image of this quality on a high vacuum XL30 Sirion. K. S. Kindt, G. Finch, and T. Nicolson, "Kinocilia Mediate Mechanosensitivity in Developing Zebrafish Hair Cells", Developmental Cell, Vol 23, (2), pgs 329-341 (2012). Katie Kindt kindtk@ohsu.edu Greg Baty greg@teleport.com Greg Baty gbaty@pdx.edu

Courtesy of Greg Baty

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 9379x
Sample: Zebrafish
Detector: TLD
Voltage: 2
Vacuum: 7e-6 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 13.2
Working Distance: 4.1
Spot: 3

Pink Grapes

Encapsulation

Courtesy of Ms. MİNE BAHCECİ , İZTECH

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 9000x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 3 kV
Working Distance: 10.0
Spot: 3.0

Mouse Lung

This is an SEM image from mouse lung.

Courtesy of Mr. SEYYED HABIB ALAVI , Oklahoma State University

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 50000
Sample: Lung Cell
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 20 kV
Working Distance: 10.4
Spot: 3.0

Pyrite in Sedimentary Rocks

PYRITE IN SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

Courtesy of Eduardo Palacios

Taken by DualBeam microscope

Magnification: 80000x
Detector: TLD
Voltage: 15.00 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 3.20 μm
Working Distance: 5.1mm

Silica Nanospheres

Silica nanospheres exposed to laser radiation on a silicon substrate.

Courtesy of Luca Boarino

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 6000x
Sample: Silicon
Detector: SE
Voltage: 2 kV
Vacuum: 0.3 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 5µm
Working Distance: 15 mm
Spot: 3.0 nA

Self Assembly of Polystyrene Nanospheres

Self assembly of 500 nm polystyrene nanospheres onto optical photoresist. The nanospheres acts like microlenses, exposing the resist and patterning it with a dot structure. After metalisation (in this case sputtered permalloy) the following lift-off leaves the metal structure on the upper pert of the microphoto. In the lower part the original array of self-assembled nanospheres used as microlenses.

Courtesy of Luca Boarino

Taken by Inspect F50 microscope

Magnification: 8000x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5 kV
Vacuum: .3 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 40 µm
Working Distance: 8.1 mm
Spot: 2 nA

Sugar Crystal

To demonstrate high quality imaging using very low accelerating voltage.

Courtesy of David McCarthy

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 187x
Sample: Sugar Crystal
Detector: SE
Voltage: 0.5KV
Vacuum: 1.42e-4 Pas
Horizontal Field Width: 1.37mm
Working Distance: 8.5mm
Spot: 3.0

Bacterial Nanocable

The new Bacterial Nanocables have been found in Aarhus Bay last year, and then published in Nature 218 (2012) 491

Courtesy of Jie Song

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Copper Creeping

Typical appearance of sulphides and bornite/djurleite particle exhibiting typical Widmannstatten texture.

Courtesy of Musarrat Safi

Taken by MLA microscope

Magnification: 1614x
Sample: typical copper nickel reaction
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 25 kV
Vacuum: -7 kbar
Horizontal Field Width: 150.
Working Distance: 11mm
Spot: 7.0

Polystyrene Microspheres

polystyrene microspheres of varying sizes

Courtesy of Yawen Li

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 872x
Sample: polystyrene
Detector: LFD
Voltage: 20kV
Vacuum: 0.373torr
Horizontal Field Width: 146um
Working Distance: 9.5mm
Spot: 3.0

Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacterial invasion

The in vivo interaction between a wild type P. aeruginosa biofilm, on a silicone implant, and the responding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. SEM visualization depicts the interaction at day 1 post insertion of the implant in peritoneal cavity of a mouse. The leukocytes (yellow) are killed by the bacteria (cyan), as seen from their damaged appearance, with obvious cavities in the membrane, after contact with the WT biofilm.

Courtesy of Michael Larsen

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Magnification: 15000x
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 5.00kV
Horizontal Field Width: 22.8 µm
Working Distance: 6.1
Spot: 4.5

Cyanobacteria - Nodularia

This cyanobacterium (Nodularia sp.) shows symbiotic bacteria (bacilli) intimately associated to the mucilage cover (extracellular polymeric substances) that serves as their food substrate. This cyanobacterium cannot be isolated without its symbiont.

Courtesy of Dr. Hugo Beraldi , Instituto de Geologia, UNAM

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 15000x
Sample: dehydrated cultured cells
Detector: SE
Voltage: 10 kV
Vacuum: 0.6 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 22 um
Working Distance: 15mm
Spot: 3

ZnO

Zinc Oxide.

Courtesy of Mr. FRANCISCO RANGEL , MCTI/INT

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 5,000x
Sample: Zinc oxide
Detector: Mix: SE plus BSE.
Voltage: 20 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 59.7 µm
Working Distance: 14.8
Spot: 3.5

Penicillium Fungus of Bread

Penicillium fungus of bread

Courtesy of wadah mahmoud

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 1200x
Sample: eating bread
Detector: SE
Voltage: 2 kV
Working Distance: 15.3 mm
Spot: 3.0

Titanium Oxide

thin film of titanium oxide

Courtesy of Liz Dagostino

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 20,000x
Sample: thin film of titanium oxide
Detector: SE
Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 14.92 μm
Working Distance: 10.0 mm
Spot: 1.5 nA

Trichomes

Three trichomes are on the leaf margin of Arabidopsis. The images is gotten by cryo-SEM.

Courtesy of Wann-neng Jane

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 453x
Sample: Leaf
Detector: SE
Voltage: 20KV
Working Distance: 5.9 mm
Spot: 3.0 nA

Copper Cupcake

Copper metal with a sulfur and chromium reaction ring

Courtesy of Laura Schlimgen

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 500x
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 25 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 50 μm
Working Distance: 10.9 mm
Spot: 6.8 nA

Cu Copper Fibers

Copper fibers created electrochemically.The image colored by photoshop.

Courtesy of wadah mahmoud

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 10,000x
Sample: copper wire
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5 kV
Working Distance: 13.7
Spot: 2.5 nA

Powder Metallurgical Molybdenum

Powder metallurgical molybdenum based alloy containing hafnium- and molybdenum-carbides.

Courtesy of Christopher Pöhl

Taken by Versa 3D microscope

Magnification: 10000x
Sample: molybdenum alloy
Detector: SE
Voltage: 20 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 20.8 µm
Working Distance: 9.9 µm
Spot: 5.5

Biogenic Silica

Search for biogenic silica in ash and pumice; Pyrite filled diatoms and likely Foraminifera.

Courtesy of Circe Verba

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 1300x
Sample: ash
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 20 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 100 micron
Working Distance: 9.1
Spot: 5

Zinc Oxide Clusters

Zinc Oxide clusters grown from a single seed. These rods are being used to study their "Field Emission" properties

Courtesy of Gerald Poirier

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 951x
Sample: ZnO
Detector: SE
Voltage: 15Kev
Vacuum: -5 torr
Horizontal Field Width: 100 μm
Working Distance: 10.2mm
Spot: 3

ZnO

It is Er doped ZnO compound. It was produced by sol-gel method. ZnO is a wide-bandgap semiconductor. As can be seen from the figure, it has hexagonal structure. ZnO has several favorable properties, including good transparency, high electron mobility, wide bandgap strong room-temperature luminescence that used in various applications. And the properties that mentioned above can be improved by adding some kind of dopings Because of these reasons we have tried to produced Er doped ZnO in nanoscale.

Courtesy of Mrs. Seydanur Kaya , Kastamonu University

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 20,000x
Sample: Metal
Detector: SE
Voltage: 10kV
Vacuum: 2,50-e4Pa
Horizontal Field Width: 10,5μm
Working Distance: 10,4
Spot: 2,5

Nano-rack

ZnO-Nanostructures grown through each other.

Courtesy of Peter Heß

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 20,000x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 3 kV
Vacuum: 0.0000277526 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 15 μm
Working Distance: 4.9
Spot: 3

Yellow Pepper

Image of black pepper flake; courtesy of student Sylvana Sawires.

Courtesy of Alyssa Calabro

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Looking into a Streptomyces coelicolor pellet

A 3D scanning electron micrograph looking into a Streptomyces coelicolor pellet (3D glasses needed). Paul Gibbons, Mohamed Moafa, Ismini Nakouti, Glyn Hobbs.

Courtesy of Dr. Ismini Nakouti , Liverpool John Moores University

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 1945 x
Sample: Cell
Voltage: 20
Vacuum: High
Working Distance: 10.0mm